Clinicopathologic Aspects, Socioeconomic Status, Life Style And Dietary Factors Associated With Specific Mutations In Colorectal Cancer In Northwest Of Iran

Roya DOLATKHAH, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Iran
DASTGIRI S. 1,2 , SOMI M. 3 , ASVADI KERMANI I. 1 , JABBARPOUR BONYADI M. 4 , FARASSATI F. 5 , FAKHARI A. 6

1 Hematology and Oncology Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran
2 Tabriz Health Services Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran
3 Liver and Gastrointestinal Disease Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran
4 Center of Excellent for Biodiversity, Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of Tabriz, Iran
5 The University of Kansas Medical School-Molecular Medicine Laboratory, Kansas City, KS, USA
6 Research Center of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran

Purposes
Although there are some known factors that can have an etiological role in colorectal cancer (CRC), however few studies have addressed how and to what extent these factors affect the genetics and the disease processes. This study aimed to investigate any relationships between clinicopathologic, lifestyle, dietary, and socioeconomic factors and the risks of specific   mutations in CRCs.
 
Methods
Patients with definitive diagnosis of colorectal cancer (n=100) were included. To perform molecular tests, fresh tissue samples from the colon and rectal areas of subjects were obtained by biopsy during colonoscopy. The presence and type of the mutations for KRAS (exon 2) and BRAF (exon 15) were determined by Sanger sequencing method. Logistic regressions were performed for computing un-adjusted and adjusted Odds Ratios (OR) with a 95% Confidence Interval (CI).
 
Results
Men had 1.37 times higher likelihood of KRAS mutation, and rectal tumors had 1.53 times higher odds of mutation. Metastatic CRCs showed 2.95 times higher likelihood of KRAS mutations and patients with a positive family history of cancer had 4.42 times higher likelihood of mutation. High socioeconomic status had significantly associated with higher likelihood of KRAS gene mutation. Findings suggest significant association of alcohol consumption and carbohydrate intake with higher likelihood of mutation. Patients with less working times and more common sedentary life style were more likely to have mutant KRAS gene. Association with BRAF mutations was not feasible due to absence of BRAF mutations in the samples.
 
Conclusion
Improving control and prevention of the risk factors, which affect the incidence of mutations associated with genetic and environmental variables, can help in enhancing the prognosis of colorectal cancer (CRC) in affected patients and in designing family-based prevention programs.
 
 
Funding sources
Hematology and Oncology Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran
 
Key Words
Colorectal Cancer; KRAS; BRAF; Mutation; Regression