Nutrient Intake Patterns And Their Association With Body Size In Black South African Females

Christine TALJAARD, , South Africa
VORSTER E. 1 , RINALDI S. 2 , JOFFE M. 3 , NORRIS S. 3 , LAUBSCHER R. 4 , CUBASCH H. 5

1 Centre of Excellence for Nutrition, Faculty of Health Sciences, North-West University (Potchefstroom Campus), Potchefstroom, South Africa
2 International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France
3 MRC/Wits Developmental Pathways for Health Research Unit, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa
4 The Biostatistics Unit, The South African Medical Research Council, Cape Town, South Africa
5 Batho Pele Breast Unit, Chris Hani Baragwanath Academic Hospital, Soweto, South Africa

Purpose:
Black South African women are in a period of transition.  Expanding urban areas contribute to lifestyle and diet changes that occur at different rates and with great inequalities.  The influence of diet and body size on breast cancer in this population needs to be investigated.  In addition, nutrient intake patterns have not yet been determined for the black female population of South Africa. The aim is to identify and describe main nutrient intake patterns and to investigate associations between nutrient intake patterns and lifestyle factors including body mass index in a sub-group (n=250) of the South African Breast Cancer (SABC) study.

Methods:  
The SABC study is a population-based case-control study on breast cancer conducted in black South African women living in Soweto Johannesburg, a high-density urban population. Questionnaire data on lifestyle, reproductive factors, physical activity/inactivity, and diet are collected from all women. Anthropometry is measured for all women, who also undergo dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and computed ultrasonography, to measure total-body visceral and subcutaneous fat. Nutrient intake patterns will be identified through a culture-specific quantified food-frequency questionnaire including 145 food items.  Principal Component Analysis (PCA) will be applied to 25 nutrients and used to depict nutrient intake patterns.
 
Results:
To date, 118 cases and matched controls have been recruited in the study.  The nutrient database is currently being implemented, and will be available in March. Results of preliminary statistical analyses to depict nutrient intake patterns, and their association with obesity and overweight in this population will be presented at the conference.

Conclusions:
This will be the first study describing main nutrient patterns in the South Africa population, and to investigate their associations with lifestyle factors.