Vaginal Human Papilloma Virus Genotype Distribution: A Profile Of Zimbabwean Women Reporting For Routine Cervical Cancer Screening

Racheal DUBE MANDISHORA, University of Zimbabwe, Zimbabwe
CHRISTIANSEN I. 2 , MATUVHUNYE T. 3 , CHIN'OMBE N. 1 , DURI K. 4 , ROUNGE T. 2 , MEISAL R. 2 , LEEGAARD T. 2 , AMBUR O. 2 , MANYERE N. 5 , STRAY-PEDERSEN B. 6 , CHIRENJE Z. 5

1 Department of Medical Microbiology, University of Zimbawe College of Health of Sciences, Harare, Zimbabwe
2 HPV Reference laboratory, Akershus University Hospital, Ahus, Norway
3 Department of applied biology and biochemistry, National University of Science and Technology, Bulawayo, Zimbabwe
4 Department of Immunology, University of Zimbawe College of Health of Sciences,Harare, Zimbabwe
5 Department of Obstetrics and gynaecology, University of Zimbawe College of Health of Sciences, Harare, Zimbabwe
6 Department of Obstetrics and gynaecology, University of Oslo Norway, Oslo, Norway

Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine the type specific prevalence of HPV in self collected vaginal swabs (VS) from Zimbabwean women reporting for routine Cervical cancer (CC) screening. There is paucity of data on type specific prevalence of HPV in Zimbabwe. Developed countries have successfully introduced HPV DNA testing for CC screening to compliment cytology; therefore our setting is looking at adopting similar algorithms.
Methods: A cross sectional study carried out at a tertiary hospital in the capital city of Zimbabwe. Women at least 18 years old reporting for routine CC screening, using visual inspection with acetic acid and cervicography (VIAC), were consecutively enrolled and trained for sample collection. Each participant provided a spot self-collected vaginal swab. Dacron swabs with a plastic applicator were used, which were broken into a cryotube with 500 microliters of guanidine thiocyanate for storage. DNA was extracted using the standard chloroform/phenol method. Illumina sequencing using the MiSeq kit and PGMY primers was done on the 450bp L1 region for HPV genotyping.
Results: Sample size was 144. Age range was 18-83 (median 38). All samples were positive for beta globin, a house-keeping gene for quality control. Overall HPV prevalence was 72%(104/144). Of the HPV positive samples the most common high risk genotypes were; HPV 18(24%), 52(23%) and 16(21%). The low risk genotypes were HPV 6(15%), 61(13%) and 53(8%).
Conclusions: HPV prevalence is relatively high. Since this was a cross sectional study it is difficult to separate new and persistent infections. Knowing the common genotypes in our setting will contribute towards design of HPV DNA screening tools and the decision on the most suitable HPV vaccine to use.
Funding source: Letten foundation funded the research in collaboration with UZ-UCSF and Akershus University hospital in Norway.