Occupational Medicine And Cancer Prevention: A Model Of Good Practice

Lucio FELLONE, University of Siena, Italy
D'IPPOLITO F. 1 , MALANGONE V. 1 , DI PEDE F. 1 , INDINI S. 1 , MINERVA S. 1 , DE VUONO G. 1,2 , FABRIZI S. 1,2 , MICELI G. 1,2 , BATTISTA G. 1,2

1 Post-graduate School in Occupational Medicine , University of Siena, Siena, Italy
2 Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Senese, University Hospital of Siena, Siena, Italy

-Purpose: Experience gained by Post-graduate School in Occupational Medicine on cancer prevention in everyday workers’ health surveillance activities (as suggested by several guidelines and by WHO) and on further ways to share information about cancer.
-Methods: Health data collection during doctor’s visits based on the International Classification of Diseases (ICD) and on “Diagnostic criteria for diseases” estabilished and endorsed by the School.
Data collection and frequent updates on overweight and obesity, smoking habit, alcohol consumption, eating habits and physical activity in each worker’s medical record.
Sharing information about cancer prevention on the website “Updating Medicina del Lavoro”, UMdL (updatingmdl.wordpress.com), a self-managed platform certified for health information based on the voluntary efforts provided by resident physicians and young occupational physicians from the University of Siena.
-Results: Yearly summary of the health data about 3,500 workers from University Hospital of Siena and University of Siena allows to conduct interventions focused on  most common risk factors and participation in group physical activities.
The UMdL website provides authorized Italian translations of IARC Press Release (starting from the n.224 on February 2014), is involved in the World Cancer Day campaigns each February 4th, shares information about occupational carcinogens (like asbestos, silica, chemotherapeutic agents handling, …), and about prevention of infection-related cancers. The website counts 12,000 visits and 6,000 visitors until now.
-Conclusions: Primary prevention is a cornerstone of good occupational medicine practice.
Based on principles of quality and comparability the collection and the analysis of data from doctor’s visits and the correct use of a website for sharing information seem to be useful tools for cancer prevention in working populations.
-Funding source:  No external funding source