Time Trends In Cancer Incidence And Mortality In A Mid-Sized Northeastern Brazilian City

Carlos LIMA, State of Sergipe health Agency; Federal University of Sergipe, Brazil
SILVA A. 3 , ALBUQUERQUE M. 3 , LIMA M. 3 , SANTOS M. 2 , OLIVEIRA J. 2 , REIS R. 2 , OLIVEIRA J. 1 , VIEIRA S. 1 , OLIVEIRA E. 1 , FRANÇA M. 1 , CARVALHO S. 1 , REZENDE A. 1

1 Aracaju Cancer Registry, State of sergipe Health Agency, Aracaju, Sergipe, Brazil
2 . Instituto Nacional de Câncer José Alencar Gomes da Silva. Coordenação de Prevenção e Vigilância, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
3 . University Hospital, Federal University of Sergipe, Aracaju, Sergipe, Brazil

Purpose: The aim of the study is to describe time trends in cancer incidence and mortality in the population of Aracaju, Sergipe Brazil. These are important to assess the impact of control strategies, and provide tools to assess determinants of cancer risk at a population level.
Methods: We retrieved incidence data from the Population-Based Cancer Registry of Aracaju and mortality data from the official State Database for the period 1996-2011. We calculated incidence and mortality crude (CR) and age-standardized (ASR) rates (direct method, world population) for 23 cancer sites according to gender. Finally, we used these data to obtain time trends of top five, using the Joinpoint Regression Model.
Results: For the period studied, we observed 7061 incident cases in men and 7976 in women; 2988 deaths in men and 3200 in women. Top five most incident cancers in men were prostate, lung lip/oral cavity/pharynx, colorectal and stomach; and in women, breast, cervix, thyroid, colorectal and lung; top five most lethal were prostate, lung, stomach, lip/oral cavity/pharynx, and liver in men; and breast, lung, cervix, colorectal, and liver in women. Incidence trends showed a rising pattern in males until 2006, and then a downward trend. For females, the pattern was similar, except for a rising pattern again from 2009 on. Mortality trends showed a rising pattern only in males.
Conclusions: The features observed in the population studied have shown similarities with the ones observed in high-income areas, but conversely have shown, considering some cancer sites, such as cervix and oral cavity, the same pattern observed in low-income areas. Incidence, mortality rates, and trends for the most frequent cancers, might reflect different exposure levels to risk factors.
Funding source: the State of Sergipe Health Agency and Brazilian Health Ministry fund Aracaju Cancer Registry. No other source funded the present study.