Screening And Brief Intervention For Distress, Alcohol And/Or Tobacco Consumption: An Epidemiological Study In An Oncology Surgical Department

Marion BARRAULT, Regional cancer center Institut Bergoniť, France
BERACOCHEA M. 1 , ALLAFORT V. 2 , BARTHELEMY V. 2 , BUSSIERES E. 2 , GARGUIL V. 3 , AURIACOMBE M. 3 , DORVAL M. 4 , M'BAILARA K. 5

1 Department of psychology, Regional Cancer Center Institut Bergoniť, Bordeaux, France
2 Oncological Surgery and Anesthetics Department, Regional Cancer Center Institut Bergoniť, Bordeaux, France
3 Department of Addiction Treatment, Charles Perrens Hospital Center, Bordeaux, France
4 Epidemiology Research Group, Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Laval University, Quebec, QC, Canada
5 Laboratory of psychology, Health and Quality of life EA 4139, University of Bordeaux, Bordeaux, France

Purpose: Alcohol and tobacco consumption have been shown to reduce treatment efficacy, increase side effects, encourage relapse and/or secondary cancers and affect the quality of life of patients being treated for cancer (Barrault et al, 2012). Despite scientific, clinical and political incentives, alcohol and/or tobacco screening and brief intervention (SBI) services are poorly implemented in primary health care settings. This study aims to describe the clinical characteristics (distress and consumption) of cancer patients included in a SBI pilot program in a surgical department in Bordeaux. To our knowledge, this is the first epidemiological study on alcohol/tobacco SBI in a cancer treatment center in France.
 
Methods: A descriptive analysis of clinical and epidemiological data of cancer patients admitted in the surgical department and consenting to participate to the SBI pilot program (consisting of a single brief motivational interview) at Institut Bergonié from September 2014 to August 2015.

Results: Among the 252 screened patients (94% women; mean age 55 ± standard deviation of 14.1 years, range 18 to 91 years; 81% treated for primary cancer, 48% for breast cancer), almost one in two (49%) patients presented with emotional distress. Twenty-six percent were tobacco smokers, 20% presented a risky alcohol use and 49% were regular alcohol consumers.

Conclusions: The results are consistent with epidemiological studies of alcohol/tobacco use on the general population showing that people continue their risky behavior after a cancer diagnosis. It also demonstrates that distress is common among this population. These data strongly support that helping people identify and cope with their risky behavior and emotional needs should be a part of routine health care in a cancer setting, in order to reduce morbidity-mortality from cancer. Further research is needed to measure the efficacy of SBI in this context.

Founding source : Ligue Nationale Contre le Cancer (2013-2016)