The Impact Of Body Mass Index On Endometrioid Endometrial Carcinoma Prognosis

Claudia CHAVES, Brazilian National Cancer Institute, Brazil
CHAVES G. 5 , SIMAO T. 6 , MOREIRA M. 3 , BERGMANN A. 4 , PINTO L. 2 , CHAVES C. 1

1 Gynecologic Oncology Department, Brazilian National Cancer Institute, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
2 Molecular Carcinogenesis Program, Brazilian National Cancer Institute, Rio de Janeiro, Brazi
3 Department of Genetics, Brazilian National Cancer Institute, Rio de Janeiro, Brazi
4 Epidemiology Department, Brazilian National Cancer Institute, Rio de Janeiro, Brazi
5 Nutrition Department, Brazilian National Cancer Institute, Rio de Janeiro, Brazi
6 Biochemistry Department, IBRAG, Rio de Janeiro State University, Rio de Janeiro, Brazi

Purposes: Endometrial cancer is the fifth most commonly diagnosed cancer among women worldwide and is classified into two subtypes of tumors with different clinicopathological features and prognosis. Endometriod endometrial carcinoma (EEC) is the most frequent subtype, is often diagnosed in early stages and present a favorable prognosis. Obesity is considered a major risk factor for EEC carcinogenesis. Several studies have described association between obesity and EEC incidence, but with no survival analysis. A recent systematic review showed controversial results concerning the role of obesity on prognosis. Therefore, the aim of this study was to analyze the impact of body mass index (BMI) in disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) in women diagnosed with EEC.
Methods: a database of EEC cases was created, comprising patients who underwent surgical treatment at Brazilian National Cancer Institute between January, 2000 and December, 2011. Clinicopathological features were collected from medical records for exploratory analysis of the variables distribution. Nutritional status were separated on euthrofic, overweight and three obesity grades, according to BMI criteria. Univariate and multivariate DFS and OS were calculated by Kaplan-Meier method and Cox Regression, respectively. Variables were considered statistical significant when p<0.05.

Results: 849 women with EEC were included. Mean age was 63.58 years-old. Mean BMI was 31.83 at time of diagnosis and 83.2% patients were obese or had overweight. Patients were followed for an average of 34.97 months. There were 111 recurrences (13.1%) with mean DFS of 51.90 months and 140 deaths (16.5%) were registered (mean OS of 52.25 months). There was no difference on DFS and OS curves related to BMI classification. Regarding OS, there was no statistically significant difference related to BMI at time of diagnosis of EEC.

Conclusion: Overweight and obesity had no impact on EEC prognosis on the assessed cohort.
Funding: CNPq, FAPERJ, CAPES, MS.