Compilation And Evaluation Of A European Nutrient Database Extension Of Methyl-Group Donors

Inge HUYBRECHTS, International Agency for Research on Cancer, France
SLIMANI N. 1 , PAUWELS S. 5,6 , VAN PUYVELDE H. 2 , VERSELE V. 3 , NICOLAS G. 1 , CASAGRANDE C. 1 , JULIÁN-ALMÁRCEGUI C. 1,4 , DE BACKER M. 2

1 Dietary Exposure Assessment Group, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France
2 Faculty of Education, Health and Social Work, Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, HoGent, Belgium
3 Faculty of Health Care, Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, HUB-KAHO, Ghent
4 Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Department of Public Health, Ghent, Belgium
5 Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Section Nutrition, Kapucijnenvoer 35 blok D box 7001, 3000 Leuven, Belgium
6 Flemish Institute of Technological Research (VITO), Unit Environmental Risk and Health, Vlasmeer 7, 2400 Mol, Belgium

Purpose:
Within the EPIC Nutrient Database project (ENDB), a reference European nutrient database was created. Values for methyl-group donors like choline, betaine and methionine were still lacking as these values were not available in national food composition tables. In this study, the ENDB has been extended with the methyl-group donors folate, choline, betaine and methionine.
Methods:
The ENDB food list was linked to 4 food composition databases that include nutritive values for folate, choline, betaine and methionine. In order of priority: the US National Nutrient Database for Standard References, the Canadian Nutrient File, the Danish Nutrient Database and the German Nutrient Database. Each ENDB food item was linked to a similar item in one of the 4 databases, respecting the order of priority. If no perfect match could be found, an appropriate recipe was searched for The matched folate values were compared with reference ENDB folate values to evaluate the validity of the methyl-group donor matching. Analysis were carried out with the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS).
Results:
Not all four methyl-group donors could be found for every food item, 1.1% missing values remained for folate, 21% for choline, 22.7% for methionine and 69.3% for betaine. Some of these missing values might be logic zeros. Strong correlations (r=0.79) were found with the standardized international folate values that are considered as reference values. Correlations were even stronger when considering the frequency of consumption of the different food items (r=0.87).
Conclusions:
Only limited food composition data was available for betaine. Strong correlations between the matched folate values and reference folate values confirm the validity of the nutrient matching. The increase in correlations when considering consumption frequencies indicates that less well matched foods are those that are less consumed.
 
Funding source:
MDB, HVP & VV were funded by the ERASMUS PROGRAMME.